Monday, May 28, 2007

Rediscovery

There's not much I enjoy more than going to my bookshelf and finding a book I never finished, picking it up and really enjoying it the second time around. Isn't that the best? Recently I was in the library and came across an author I never gave much of a chance to grow on me the first time around. My brother gave the book Practical Demonkeeping by Christopher Moore and I kind of just thanked him and stuck it on my shelf. I assumed he was making fun of me (which he probably was) or making some sort of not-so-subtle comment about my kids (which may have also been true); either way, the result was that I never gave the book a proper look. So anyway, I'm looking at the collective works of Christoper Moore, recognizing the Practical Demonkeeping title and thinking I should maybe give it a try when another title jumps out at me: BloodSucking Fiends: A Love Story Isn't that a book that just begs to be read? Well, I thought so. And maybe it was just timing, but this book hit my funny bone in all the right ways. Like many authors, Moore chooses to make his main character, C. Thomas Flood, an aspiring writer (write what you know and all that) and I just thought the thought processes of the character were just hilarious. For example: Like so many great writers before him, Flood was known for his troubled countenance and sickly pallor, especially under fluorescent lighting. Those who knew him said that even in those early years they could sense that this thin, serious young man would make his presence known as a great man of letters as well as a sexual dynamo. His legacy to the world was a trail of great books and broken hearts, and although it is well known that his love of life was his downfall, he felt no regret, as illustrated in his Nobel Prize acceptance speech: "I have followed my penis into hell and returned with the story." I just love that. And then there's the other main character, Jody, the red-headed vampire love interest of Flood. Only in a book like this could the vampire kick the crap out of 3 would be attackers, one of whom happens to be wearing a Raiders jacket, and yell "Forty-F***ing-Niners!" at them as they lay paralyzed or unconscious. My kind of girl. This was the first book in a long time to keep me up past my bedtime, so needless to say I'm going back to my bookshelf and finding that old copy of Practial Demonkeeping.

19 comments:

ShadowFalcon said...

I'm going to look out for that book.

I think books have a time and place, you cna try and read one 100 times and not get and then one day you pick it up and can't believe how good it is...

SQT said...

Despite the lack of interest in this post (what's up with that?) it's a pretty good book. Mostly though, I was trying to comment on finding good stuff just languishing on the shelf. I must've failed to make that point.

Jean-Luc Picard said...

Good humour there!

Fab said...

I don't know that book. Will check it.
I have run out of shelf space in my book area. But still I find books on top of other books. Some also half read, some untouched (a shame really). I just found between Shakespeare's works and Feist a tiny book: What mad universe? by Fredric Brown. I think someone left it by mistake... never read it. Should I?

avery said...

I've had Christopher Moore on standby for a while, now. I guess I'll have to move him up in the queue.

Stewart Sternberg said...

I love Christopher Moore. I plan on reading two of his books this summer.

By the way...if you have never read his novel: "Lamb---The Gospel According to Biff, Jesus' boyhood pal", it is one of the funniest things I have ever tore through. Between Pratchett and Gaimen's "Good Omens" and "Lamb", a person could have a truly irreverent good time. "Lamb"'s the funnier, but "Omens" is the better written.

Stewart Sternberg said...

Fab, Frederick Brown is the master of the short short. He was able to churn out some of the most ingenious little tales ever written. I wouldn't look for profundity in his writing, but he certainly knew how to entertain.

SQT said...

Oooh, I'll get Lamb next.

Alex said...

Oh, for the love of Zeus!

The protagonist's name is flood, and he's dating a vampire? If he were a transsexual, the irony would reach the point of absurdity!

SQT said...

Stewart, I actually went to the bookstore to get a copy of "Lamb" today and their computers were down. I had a gift card left over from Mother's Day and couldn't use it. I was pi$$ed. My library has a copy so I'm going to go there tomorrow and the stupid bookstore can keep their money (for now anyway). So there.

Fab said...

Thanks Stewart. It doesn't have to be profound, as long as it's well written and amusing to me. Will check "Lamb" as well.

Lee said...

I find that I get different things out of books at different times of my life too.

Christopher Moore cracks me up. I will have to go hunt up Practical Demonkeeping!

Kate S said...

Ooh! Thanks for the heads up - they book look like fun.

I assumed he was making fun of me (which he probably was) or making some sort of not-so-subtle comment about my kids (which may have also been true)

ROFL

SQT said...

*sigh* I caved and bought "Lamb" today. I'm not sorry though, it's funny right from the get go. Though if you're like Alex and don't like obvious irony, maybe check it out from the library first.

Kate, thanks!

Stewart Sternberg said...

I didn't see Lamb as ironic. I wouldn't classify its tone as that. Nor is it satire. It could have been profound, but Moore chose to opt for hilarity. He succeeded. The only problem is the ending. But then, what the hell can you do with crucification? Unless you're Monty Python. What works for Moore is that his work is seldom cruel or mean spirited.

SQT said...

Stewart, I haven't read enough to know whether it's ironic or not. Mostly I was just trying to make the joke that it's likely to offend Alex's sensibilities.

Alex said...

Honestly, SQT, what isn't likely to offend my delicate sensibilities? I am a literature snob and proud of it.


Down with Harry Potter!

Stewart Sternberg said...

Alex, I've been to your website and I would hardly classify you as a literary snob. Or at least there's no evidence of that there, or even on this site. I think snob...okay. But literary? Wouldn't you first have to have taste?

Kiss me..you want to.

pussreboots said...

Practical Demonkeeping is a better book than Bloodsucking Fiends.