Wednesday, January 10, 2007

Feasibility Cont...

I just love the post Stewart put up a couple of days ago about the feasibility of comics, in particular Superman's ability to procreate. What fun discussions those posts generate. But isn't that what's great about fantasy and sci-fi? Wondering what if? I remember when the first Matrix movie came out. That was a fun scenario to ponder wasn't it? I kinda makes me want to do the Keanu Reeves "whoa." It's not that I think we're all flesh and blood batteries or anything weird like that. But I like the idea of tweaking reality a little bit. Or wondering if there are other realities out there that we just aren't aware of. For example, I mentioned time travel in an earlier post. Who hasn't thought about the feasibility of time travel? Do you think we'll ever have the ability to bend time in such a way that we can go back and change history? And what happens if we do? Will our collective memories change? Will certain people cease to exist? The mind boggles at the potential paradoxes. Movies like the Sixth Sense make me wonder if there are really folks who "see dead people" or if they are all a bunch of charlatans. I kind of like the idea that maybe, just maybe, there is a spiritual plane of existence that is reaching out to ours from time to time. I still think most would be psychics are quacks, but who knows, maybe one or two are legit. I also wonder what space travel will be like in the future? Will it be like Star Trek or not even close? Will we make huge technological advances enabling widespread space travel in the near future, or is it something that is going to take hundreds of years, if ever? And you can't talk about feasibility without mentioning all the movies and TV shows that have contact with creatures from outer space. From E.T. to The X-Files we love to contemplate what would happen if we made contact with intelligent life from another planet. Of course, there are those who think this has already happened and it's all being covered up by The Government in a big conspiracy. Me? I tend to think our government is too disorganized for any kind of quality cover-up, but maybe I'm just naive. So when you think of sci-fi or fantasy, what is your favorite topic to discuss? Are there any movies or TV shows that get you to wondering? Or we could just go back to wondering if Superman can have sex, that's good too.

24 comments:

jedimerc said...

Alternate histories, realities, and time travel (which some think is effectively a form of alternate dimensions). Needless to say my comic/ sci fi influences in this regard include 'Fantastic Four', 'Star Trek', Harry Turtledove, and to a lesser extent Michael Crighton (for 'Timeline'... the book not the historically bereft movie :)

And to me, the idea of alternate realities and histories are most feasible, only because I feel every action we take can create an alternate realm... for good or ill.

Stewart Sternberg said...

I like alternate realities, but within reason. Do you remember the Star Treks where Kirk and company first landed on a planet where they held gladiator fights? Or the time they ended up in the middle of a Chicago-style mob war? sigh...

You know what, I love spy movies, but the stuff I enjoy mosts tends to come close to being genre...almost sci fi in its tech leanings. Mission Impossible, the James Bond films, the Man from UNCLE (when oh when will MGM release those on dvd???), Emma and Steed from the Avengers? Hell, The Avengers often lapsed into scifi. Who could forget Christopher Lee as android?

SQT said...

Oh, we should (or maybe Stewart should) do a post just on spy movies. I love those too.

ShadowFalcon said...

The great thing about sci-fi is that anything is possible be it in this universe or a paralell one!

like sliders

Angela/SciFiChick said...

Fun things to ponder...

Lee said...

My kids and I watched Aeon Flux last night (loved it) and had an interesting conversation about how this plot could actually happen. Was a little creepy.

Jeffrey said...

Time Travel would be used for evil. Who wouldnt want to change certain things for the betterment of mankind, only you dont know what the backlash through history catching up would be.

Alternate dimensions would be our alternate histories, a differnt choice or action created this....etc etc..

My biggest Sci Fi fear are things that are grounded in fact, totalitarian governments or global disasters, something so huge that the brain cant grasp but can fear.

SQT said...

Jeffrey

You're probably right. I think most people are motivated by self-interest. If time-travel technology were developed by an individual, I doubt they would go back or forward in time looking to benefit all mankind, but rather themselves personally. And heaven forbid any government body have the technology. Btw, thanks for stopping by.

Lee- Aeon Flux was interesting. It seems like there's a lot of interest lately in the prospect of mankinds longterm ability to procreate. "Children of Men" takes on this too and it supposed to be pretty good.

Hitler had a huge interest in eugenics and I wouldn't be surprised if that's something that ends up being in the forefront of our news in the near future. How long before parents are selectively choosing features for their kids; blue eyes maybe, or making sure they grow to a certain height?

Crunchy Carpets said...

My dh's big thing which is sort of like the Matrix is the idea of a Holographic Universe ..and in fact if we only realized it...we ARE in control of the world and how it works......apparently there are a gajillion websites on this stuff.

When it comes to feasability...look at the whole cyberpunk genre....it fed on the negativity of a generation and the idea that there is not much 'good' in our future, no matter how cool our toys are.

I think in many ways folks like William Gibson and Neal Stevenson are great but pessimistic futurists.

But they look at our use of cell phones and the internet and how Global Corporations have more sway than a countries government and so on.

Irene said...

I never understood The Matrix. Sigh...

On the other hand, I know people who have the sixth sense so I know it's true. It's eerie...but true.

Hope your 2007 is off to a great start! =)

Jon the Intergalactic Gladiator said...

My favorite sci-fi is the "Milla Jovovich takes on the giant evil corporation or tyranical government" genre.

mist1 said...

I want to talk about if it's possible for invisible super heroes to see or not. In movies, they can always see even though they are invisible. I don't think that this is the way that our eyes work. I mean, if they can pass through walls and stuff, it seems like light would pass through them and not bounce off our retinas or whatever it is in there that light bounces off of. So, it would seem like they wouldn't be able to see. Please feel free to discuss.

Stewart Sternberg said...

excellent mist. Absolutely. Of course it would depend on the kind of invisibility. You assume that light is passing through Invisible Girl. But what if it were being bent..perhaps it hits her and her body serves as some sort of filter, changing the light frequency so that we no longer see her.

Maybe she isn't invisible. Maybe she projects a sheild that bends those frequencies.

Stewart Sternberg said...

One last thing...on the topic of sex. Sex with Invisible Girl would be the worst. I am a visual kind of guy. If she turned invisible, it would be a major turn off.

At first I tried thinking of the positives. Maybe the possibility of public sex? But then I thought, no. I would just be arrested for exposure while she would get off Scott free.

I have to say Mystique still. Hot to start, hotter as she morphs.

jedimerc said...

Well, early sci fi (and even plausible sci fi) has had some snags, and some of those odd Star Trek realities were... different, though I believe those were technically part of the 'theory' of parallel evolution, or parallel world development or some nonsense, not alternates per say... the one 'Star Trek' that stood out for me was the episode 'Parallels' that has Worf jumping between different realities... interesting concept though the story was so-so.

Spy-tech (there is a great dice rpg called Spycraft that handles the genre well) is very cool too. I rather like post-modern tech.

On the other hand of the spectrum, who wouldn't want a lightsaber either? :)

SQT said...

Lightsaber, yeah......
I've done martial arts for years so I am proficient in a few weapons. I never liked the sword though, it's not practical for everyday defence; I keep nunchuks on my nightstand table. But if there really was such a weapon as a lightsaber, I would be a heck of a lot more interested in that style of fighting.

jedimerc said...

I fenced for years, so I prefer swordplay even if it has gone out of style (though LARPing can cure those blues sometimes, but nothing like the clash of steel :)

Hey there, Skippy said...

Just popping by to say hi, SQT!

Edward Ott said...

personally i think when aliens show up they will be here to sell us some sort of cola and cheap toys for our kids.

SQT said...

Hi Skippy!

You know what I always wonder about? Why is it so many aliens are humanoid in nature? I can understand that maybe the filmakers think anthing too "alien" might be off-putting. But what's the likelihood that any alien life form will look remotely like us?

Also, whenever I watch Star Trek or anything set in space, there are an awful lot of planets that are hospitable to humans.

jedimerc said...

If you've read or seen 'Andromeda Strain', it proposes that the first life to contact us will be bacterial or viral in nature, and is the most likely of percentages.

I think the 'humanoid' aliens (even if they are foul creatures like the Aliens) simply sells better. While 'Andromeda Strain' was a great story, aliens we can truly interact with make great copy. On the other hand, Asimov created a whole universe without the prospect of alien life (a bit idealistic, but cool nonetheless), though humans evolve into near-alien species in the future of his novels.

Stewart Sternberg said...

I thought the Andromeda strain was produced on earth, then in space, exposed to radiation aboard a satellite or space station, it mutated, all as part of an experiment. I could just have a flawed but really pretty memory.

gugon said...

I could talk all day about feasibility in science fiction.

On the subject of aliens that look human - that was thing that really drove me crazy about Star Trek. Even the original series mixed things up a bit: gave us the Horta and the Mugato and those bat things. But then with the newer series' it's like they just gave up. Every alien was basically a human with a funny ridge on its forehead.

I also like to imagine what happens AFTER the events of a film. I had a lot of fun with a couple blog entries on the aftermath of King Kong.

The Curmudgeon said...

"Every alien was basically a human with a funny ridge on its forehead."

Or nose. Or ears.

Hey, make-up costs less money than CGI! But there is a theory that evolution -- even on other planets -- should favor development of upright-walking bipedal species. It's a theory that may be encouraged by sci-fi producers... but until someone meets the real thing, who's to say it makes no sense?

And SQT -- "It's not that I think we're all flesh and blood batteries or anything weird like that."

I must tell you how relieved I am to hear this!